Saw Palmetto Berries Organic

$5.30

Saw Palmetto Berry 2 ounces

4 in stock

SKU: 209550-31 Category: Tag:

Product Description

Description:
Used as a tonic saw palmetto helps regain strength after illness. It also can be used to help people put on weight. Saw palmetto makes the bladder strong and improves urination causing toxins to be flushed out of the body. In cases of prostate infection, the berries gently stimulate urination, causing the infectious microorganisms to be “flushed out” with urine.

Research show is improves the sex drive in men and can enhance a woman’s breasts.

Latin Name:
Serenoa repens

Common Names:
Palmetto scrub, Cabbage palm

Parts Used:
Berries, dried and cut or powdered.

Properties:
Diuretic, sedative, and tonic.

Traditional Uses:
Teas, tinctures, and capsules

Topical Uses / Applications:

Culinary Uses:
Not normally used in cooking.

Chemical Properties:
Beta-sitosterol, capric acid, ferulic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid.

Cautions:
GRAS: Generally Recognized As Safe. This herb can safely be consumed when used appropriately. There are extremely rare cases of stomach problems.

Folk Lore:
American botanist John Lloyd saw the first effects of the saw palmetto on grazing animals and concluded the effects would carry over to people. It was widely used as a general health tonic in 1870’s and they found it could be used as an appetite stimulant.

Native Americans in the South used it for survival food and a general tonic for making a person feel good. French researchers isolated the specific compounds that works on the prostate to preserve male potency and it has been used to enlarge breasts in women and works well for hair loss.

These statements have not been evaluated by the food and drug administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Resources:
PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2000. Medical Economics Company, Montvale, New Jersey.

The New Holistic Herbal. David Hoffmann, 1990. Barnes and Noble Books, New York.

A Modern Herbal, Mrs. M. Grieve, (Dover Publications, New York, 1971)

Major Herbs of Ayurvedic.Compiled by Dahur Research Foundation and Dahur Ayurvet Limited, Ghaziabad, India., 2002. Churchill Livingstone, London, England.

Chinese Herbal Medicine: Materia Medica, Third Edition, Dan Bensky and Andrew Gamble, 1986. Eastland Press, Seattle, WA.

Additional Information

Weight 3.63 oz